Poems about icicles, German and pens

Note: Any poem with just a date listed is “untitled”.

2-11-2011 — Ode to the Icicle Liberator

Why do I love

To break off icicles?

When I see them

Dangling from buildings

Clear to milky white

Smooth

Shiny

Sometimes sharp,

Sometimes blunt

They beckon me

To rescue them

To break them off

To free them

To become water again.

I break them off,

Slippery and cold,

The snap a brittle twig.

I wonder if people watch,

Laughing,

Rolling their eyes,

Shaking their heads,

Wondering why

That big-nosed guy

Acts so weird.

They assume I have a choice

And they assume wrong.

To walk past a distressed icicle

To ignore its pleas

Is to tolerate

An unreachable, insatiable itch.

As the great philosophers Hall and Oates said:

“I can’t go for that. No can do.”

A simple pleasure

Is how I see it.

 2-13-2011 — Sprechen Sie Deutsch?

“Sprechen Sie Deutsch?”

“Nein,” I’d say.

Hesitating, my choppy, slow reply:

“Ich keine spreche Deutsch.”

If not the grammar,

My American accent

Butchers the language

Of mein Urgroßvater.

I say my r’s in the soft way Americans do,

Ruff! Rrrrrr!

Instead of saying them like w’s.

The umlats ä , ö , ü

Are, well, foreign.

Why do some Germans

Say “kh” for “ch”

Others “sh” for “ch”?

Funny how a language

So closely related to English

Can sound so different.

2-13-2011 — Pens

I know many look at me

Cringing

Murmuring

Rolling their eyes

Laughing

Gossiping

Wondering why

Richard is

So obsessed

With pens.

I like being creative.

Creativity demands

Insists

Commands

Specific pens

With a specific color.

Black ink might work

For most people

But I am not most people.

I’m different.

Papermates and Zebras for me.

Black, blue, red, purple

(Not wild about green)

Make me squeal.

My fingers dance

Great writing gets done.

Richard Zowie writes poems first using pen and paper and then transfers them onto a computer for posting on his blogs. Post comments here or e-mail richardzowie@gmail.com.

Advertisements

Goodbye, ‘The Hunt For Red October’, hello ‘Anne Frank: Diary of a Young Girl’

Well, technically I didn’t finish reading read Tom Clancy’s novel The Hunt For Red October. I tried. Twice. This time, I made it halfway through the book before finishing the rest in skim mode. I’ll watch the movie soon when I can.

The idea was great, and I agree with a lot of Clancy’s politics. The problem was, I found this book to be far too technical. Clancy likes to describe technology, intelligence procedures and military equipment in explicit detail. It made for slow pacing and, frankly, boring reading. Yes, I know that President Ronald Reagan loved this book (which tells me his attention span was far longer than what his critics care to admit). But for me, while Clancy has great ideas, it just didn’t work for me.

Years ago, I tried reading Patriot Games and didn’t finish that, either. It seemed too far-fetched that Irish terrorists would travel to American soil to avenge a crime. I may try sometime to read Cardinal in the Kremlin, since it deals with a spy for America inside the Kremlin. Maybe. Other books are awaiting my time. Sometime soon, I’ll have to make some time to read Ben Bova’s Mercury. As readers of this blog know, Dr. Bova has turned into one of my favorite sci-fi writers. If you haven’t read Jupiter, do yourself a favor and read it…

I’ve read the first entry of Anne Frank’s iconic diary. This was originally required as reading in my high school in the freshman or sophomore honors English program, but since I didn’t take honors English until my junior year, I missed out.

Little did Anne Frank know, her writings to “Kitty” would become an important piece of literature.

I look at Miss Frank as a delve into two genres of literature: classic (it was written in the 1940s and, technically, was written not only in the prior century, but also in the prior millennium) and foreign (the German-born, Dutch-raised Frank was Jewish and penned her diary in Dutch). What we read in English is a translation.

Having a short attention span has always made it a challenge for me to start and complete classics in literature, especially if they seem slow or are filled with archaic language. We’ll see how this process goes.

I am determined to succeed.

Post comments here or e-mail Richard at richardzowie@gmail.com.