New Year’s resolutions

me writing

Since I will be turning 45 in February, I have decided to keep my New Year’s resolution simple this year.

Publish one short story.

I plan to start looking at the Writer’s Market 2018 to see if there are any potential markets for short Christian fiction or for a few unpublished, Twilight Zone-style stories I’ve completed.

Perhaps “completed” is too optimistic a word. Any writer will tell you no story is ever perfectly written. I’m sure Stephen King sometimes looks at his early stories and wishes he could change this or that about them. He once wrote about the pleasant surprise he got when his short story, Sometimes They Come Back (which I’ve read, it’s in his Night Shift collection of short stories), was published. He was paid $500 for a story he admitted that he didn’t think would sell anywhere.

Perhaps I should try to get an agent.

Among my short stories that are either completed or need a little more tinkering:

Garth, Texas: A fugitive and scam artist’s car breaks down in rural West Texas during a heat wave. He walks to a town to get help–and wishes he’d kept on walking.

No Experience Necessary: A former Army soldier with a dwindling bank account accepts a job that pays well and says “no experience necessary.” You know what they say: “If it’s too good to be true…”

Dear Billy: Sincerely, Billy: If you love to write science fiction or Twilight Zone or Outer Limits-inspired tales, you’re bound to try your hand at time travel. In this, set in 1983, a teenaged boy visits a library and is told there’s a letter for him. It’s written by a man who claims to be him, and it’s dated 1859. The boy learns one decision done differently can change everything.

David’s Decision: What went on during the mental tug of war that led to King David deciding to sleep with the wife of one of his most loyal soldiers?

What If…?: I’ve always wondered what would’ve happened had Adam and Eve not sinned and had resisted the serpent.


Two poems: The Questions I Have, Afternoon Bright Light

 The first poem is pentameter and the second one attempts to rhyme. Decided to take a break from free verse.

2-8-11 — The Questions I Have

NOTE: This is a pentameter poem. Didn’t feel comfortable trying to make it rhyme

The questions I have

Mainly mysteries

The answers mock me

Daring me to learn

Of all their secrets

The five W’s

And, of course, the H.

How is it that God

Has no beginning

Nor has an ending?

I don’t understand

The meaning of the

Hebrew name Calel

(Which means, “All of God”).

What mysteries lie

Underneath all the

Salmon, pink and white

Swirling tapestry

Clouds of Jupiter?

What is the smallest

Unit of matter?

Is it something that

Makes quarks seem as big

As Andromeda?

(The constellation?

No. the galaxy).

Finally, would life

Be any real fun

If there were no more

Questions to answer?

2-8-11 — Afternoon Bright Light

NOTE: a few rhymes here.

The blinding afternoon light

From the sun

Hardly brings afternoon delight

To me

As I try to work.

I reach into my pocket

For my shades.

The sunglasses are

Much-needed aides

To shield my eyes

From the angry glare.

Even in the brown tint

The sun is a

Bright white fire

That never seems to tire.

The only thing I like

About the fierce glare

Is it helps my eyes

Decide to look green.

Normally my hazel eyes–

–a lot of green

With a little brown–

Can’t decide if they want to be


Brown or


The afternoon light

Is afternoon delight

When it makes my hazel eyes

Look bright

Instead of

Dull and dark.

Richard Zowie is trying his hand at writing poems. Post comments here or send them to

My thoughts on Isaac Asimov’s short story ‘The Last Question’

I finally read Isaac Asimov’s The Last Question. Fascinating story, one that bears re-reading. I found it to be very enjoyable. To those who might be offended by it, they are forgetting it is science fiction. I personally believe God is eternal and unchanging, but, obviously, to the humanist Asimov, “god” comes about through enough evolution on the part of civilizations.

Or maybe I’m completely misinterpreting the story.

It does make you wonder something: is this story really intended to be in the distant future or is it describing events from the distant past? When God says “Let there be light” in Genesis, perhaps in Asimov’s mind the “god” of this short story was the result of perfection from the cumulative knowledge of countless other civilizations eons ago. Or, maybe it is a declaration that will be made trillions of years from now.

I have often thought that atheism, in its purest form, actually does not disbelieve in the existence of a higher power; rather, the belief is that mankind through enough sufficient eons of evolution can become godlike.

If you believe in billions upon billions of years of evolution (I do not), it is sobering to think that billions upon billions of years from now in another civilization in a distant galaxy, it will be as though we on earth never existed.

Richard Zowie is a Michigan-based writer who enjoys reading science fiction (even though he believes in creationism but also likes to keep an open mind). Post comments here or e-mail him at