What is the future of journalism?

A certain newspaper closed down a few months ago. Besides a major lack of local reporting (the lifeblood of just about every newspaper, since residents want to know what’s going on in their area), one fatal blow to this paper was its publisher’s refusal to get a website.

Not only did they not web-publish, but they also had NO website.

I found it flabbergasting, especially since when I began in journalism in 2000, even then the newspaper (the Kelly Observer) was already publishing online. These days, you have to at least have a website. Otherwise, people think you are as ancient as a vinyl album. Once you have a website, figure out if and how online publishing can work.

One newspaper I’ve seen back home in Texas has a three-part subscription plan: 1) Print newspaper only; 2) Print and online newspaper and 3) Online newspaper only. #1 is for the old-school types who prefer a printed newspaper and don’t like online news. The second is for those who like both and the third is for either those who prefer online news only or for those who live far away and can only access fresh editions online.

Furthermore, the newspaper has this policy: if you don’t have an online subscription, you can read only the first paragraph. Once you buy an online subscription, you are issued a user name and password and can then read whatever part of the newspaper you want.

Other newspapers, such as the Flint Journal and the San Antonio Express-News, make their news available to anyone who accesses their sites without a subscription. I don’t know how well or if this works. I do know the Journal has in recent years past been doing a lot of layoffs; maybe there’s a connection, and maybe not.

I read a lot of online news and also access news through my cell phone. But, I must admit, I really like sitting, relaxing and reading the print edition. Besides news, sports, entertainment and comics (my current favorite is Luann), I also like to do the puzzles in the comics section.

I’m 40. In 50 years I will be 90. I don’t know if I will still be alive, but I do feel print newspapers will definitely be dead. Fortunately, for all the old-school types who prefer print news, they will probably be deceased also.

Richard Zowie is a journalist, columnist, blogger and fiction writer. Post comments here or e-mail them to richardzowie@gmail.com.

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A trio of haiku about my favorite planet

Yes, I live on earth, but I have long been fascinated with Pluto. It’s in frigid darkness, far from the sun in the solar system’s outer reaches. Here’s a set of three haiku I wrote recently about Pluto. (The bold line is the first line of each haiku)…

Small, white moving blip

Against endless field of stars

Found 1930.

Then, blip was bigger

1978 bump

Was found on the blip.

No longer “planet”

We shall learn of its secrets

Three summers from now.

pluto latest

What astronomers believe Pluto looks like, from three looks at its surface…

Richard Zowie is a writer who thinks the decision to demote Pluto to planetoid was subjective and stupid. Post comments here or e-mail Richard at richardzowie@gmail.com.